Evans' DC Update

Evans' common knowledge from DC

President Obama Speaks at the Tribal Nations Conference

President Obama Speaks at the Tribal Nations Conference last week

Get the FULL Text at:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/12/05/remarks-president-tribal-nations-conference

Evans with DC Internet Technology

For Your Success,

Evans Craig,
Socila Network Connoisseur
www.EvansCraig.com
www.DC-Internet-Tech.com

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December 13, 2012 Posted by | Native News | , , , , , | Leave a comment

American Indian Society of Washington DC (AIS) Calendar Of Events

American Indian Society of DC logoAIS Meetings 1st Wed. of every month – 7:30 pm (Jan 2, Feb 6, Mar 6, Apr  3)
The Church of St. Clement Episcopal, 1701 N. Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA

Baltimore American Indian Center Cultural Classes – Thursdays 6:00-9:00
pm; Holistic Health Services – Thursdays 11:00 am-3:00 pm (call 410.675.3535 or email  thomas.melody.c@gmail.com)
Baltimore American Indian Center, 113 South Broadway, Baltimore, MD. 410-675-3535. www.baic.org

Dec 15 – AIS Christmas Crafts Bazaar (Setup 9 am, Doors open at 10 am, Close at 4 pm) and
Christmas Party (6 pm), The Church of St. Clement Episcopal, 1701 N. Quaker Lane, Alexandria, VA.
Please bring potluck dish for Christmas Party. To participate in gift  exchange, bring unisex gifts: adults  $10 gift/children $5 gift. Vendors contact Mitchell Bush 804.241.5462.

Jan 12 – Morning Star Celebration, 13th Annual Benefit powwow for St. Labre Indian School (suggested donation $5/ adult, $2/child), John Carroll School, 703 E. Churchville Rd, Bel Air, MD 21014 (I-95, exit 85, follow Rt. 22 to Bel Air, school on left). Contact Gary Scholl 410-838-8333 x 2002 or glsjcs@yahoo.com website: http://morningstarpowwow.com

AMERICAN INDIAN INAUGURAL BALL – JANUARY 18-21, 2013

Jan 18 – Lounge Reception, 1700 Lounge (cover charge applies-open to all), Crystal Gateway Marriott, 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202

Jan 19 – Inaugural Ball Pow Wow (afternoon Gourd Dance, early evening  Grand Entry), Crystal Gateway Marriott, 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202

Jan 20 – American Indian Inaugural Ball, Crystal Gateway Marriott, 1700  Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202

Jan 21 – Inaugural Ball Brunch, Crystal Gateway Marriott, 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202

Info: aisball2013@live.com          Website: www.aisball2013.com

Volunteers for American Indian Inaugural Ball

A few volunteers are needed for assistance with various activities for
the American Indian Inaugural Ball being held on Sunday, January 20, 2013.
Volunteers & Assistance is needed for:

  • Friday evening, January 18th,
  • Saturday, January 19th,
  • And especially for Sunday, January 20th, the day and evening of the ball.

Please send email indicating your availability and any areas of expertise to: aisball2013@live.com

Your kind assistance will be rewarded with a discounted (or even free!)  ticket to the ball.

2013 Pow-Wows

  1. June 1-2
    Fredericksburg Pow-Wow, Fredericksburg, VA Fairgrounds
  2. July 13-14
    Howard County Pow-Wow, 1022 Fairgrounds Rd, West Friendship,  MD 21794;
  3. Nov 15-17
    Great American Indian Exposition & Pow-Wow,
    The Showplace,
    3000 Mechanicsville Turnpike,
    Richmond, VA 23223
    Contact: Barry Richardson 252-532-0821 email: powwow@vance.net
CHECK the AIS Website at www.aisdc.org for updates on events between  newsletters.

Evans with DC Internet Technology

For YOUR Success,

Evans Craig,
Social Network Connoisseur
www.EvansCraig.com
www.DC-Internet-Tech.com

December 13, 2012 Posted by | Native News, Updates | , , , | Leave a comment

DC Intertribal Drum Circle (this Sat!)

DC Intertribal Drum Circle

Calling all Handrum carriers!

The DC Drum Circle is back & taking 2012 by storm!

Then bring out your hand-drums, because we will be holding an “Intro to a Drum Circle & Blessing” in Washington, DC this Saturday afternoon (May 19) at 3:00. We will conduct a blessing, then be learning a bit about Drum Etiquette & then learn a hand drum song to start out with.

Location: 520 10TH STREET NW, SECOND FLOOR | WASHINGTON DC 20004

Bring your Hand Drums, Flutes and rattles, & lets have some fun!

Drumming can be healing, meditative, relaxing and/or energizing. It can take you on a journey deep within yourself or to other levels of consciousness. Whether you play a drum, shake a rattle, dance, sing and chant, or simply sit back and take it all in, we all create the circle together.

So come. Bring a drum, bring a rattle or just bring yourself, and join us for an afternoon of healing, rhythm and spirit. No previous drumming or drum circle experience required, only an open heart and an open mind. All types of drums and percussion instruments welcome as well as didgeridoos and flutes.

FWD This to your friends!

The DC Intertribal Drum Circle in Downtown Washington, DC is this Sat., May 19 at 3:00 – 5:00 pm at Luminous Warrior (right near the Hard Rock Cafe in DC).

* In Feb’s Drum Circle, we learned about Drum protocol, learned some common drum beats, a Dawning Song and corresponding Round Dance too.
* In March’s Drum Circle, we learned about the “Healing Sounds” & corresponding Chakras.
* In April’s Drum Circle, we learned even more about that Drum that has been hanging on your wall all this time & created drumsticks for YOUR handdrum.
* In this months Drum Circle, we will be learning another song, the song of the Ripeners (the Insect People) an Emergance Song from our Dine’ Creation Story.

You can read more here
http://luminouswarrior.com/upcoming-events/dc-intertribal-drumming-circle.
Next event is next Sat., May 19 at 3pm. Hope to see you then!
Sign-up below!!

Energy Exchange: $10 donation requested (all donations gratefully accepted).

Sign up at Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/events/273766856053120/
or
email Evans (evans@evanscraig.com ) or Sara (sara@luminouswarrior.com )
(202)710-2995      and      (202) 670-7086

Come on out for the DC InterTribal Drum Circle all summer!
Planning on scheduling some on the Mall!
Our Schedule is here: http://bit.ly/lwdrumcircle

(usually the third weekend of every month)

PS: Be on the lookout for our NEW “Sacred Events App” for smartphones. The first one, “DC Sacred Events App” will be FREE to all my loyal readers! Just get on our DC Natives Listing at dcnatives-subscribe

Subscribe to dcnatives

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Get YOUR smartphone App (i.e. iPhone, Anndroid, Wndows Phone, etc….)
made for YOUR Groups’ Special Events in YOUR customers/clients hands NOW!

Imagine YOUR Mobile App in YOUR Clients/Customers hands

Thanks,

Evans Craig | DC Internet Marketing | Nations Internet | Internet Technology Service | First Nations Internet Cafe | Tribal Mall

Living an Inspired Life!

Evans' DC Update

May 17, 2012 Posted by | DC Drum Circle, Native News, Updates | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shamanic Drum Making Workshop and Sound Therapy

Shamanic Drum Making

& Drumming Sound Therapy

with Azurae Windwalker

Sun. July 1, 10 am – 5pm Drum making
6 – 8 pm Drumming Sound Therapy

at the Amethyst Center near Roanoke VA

Make you own “Tree of Life Drum” on July 1, 2012

Make your own drum, awaken it as a healing tool, and learn rhythms and healing techniques for healing self and Mother Earth.

Azurae Windwalkers Drum Making
Experience the satisfaction of crafting your own instrument from a Shamanic teacher with 25 years experience in drum making and sound therapy drumming.

Hundreds now enjoy Tree of Life Drums. Our drums are very resonating and stay tuned much longer than others in humid weather. Women make these easily as the design requires more craftsmanship than strength. In the Sound Therapy Drumming workshop you will learn advanced how to use a variety of drum beats in your practice. And combine your drumming with chanting, energy medicine, sacred geometry, shamanic journey and meditation.

You will awaken your drum as an instrument of healing in sacred ceremony! Azurae is a member of the American Women’s Indigenous Drum Society and the Red Feather Medicine Singers

Times:

Drum Making – 10 am – 5 pm.
Sound Therapy Drumming 6 pm – 8 pm.

Make a down payment of $100 two weeks before (by June 20.) the workshop to buy materials.Total payment of $250 includes materials, instruction, workbook and sound therapy workshop. Attend Sound Therapy Drumming workshop only for $75. Bring a potluck dish to share and sharp sissors.

Send your $100 Deposit by June 20 to:

Azurae Windwalker
4443 Quarterwood Rd.,
Thaxton, VA 24174

Call 540-947-2423 or  azuraewwlkr8@earthlink.net   to register
www.theAmethystCenter.com

Registration & Directions.doc

—–

Evans Craig,
Social Network Connoisseur
www.EvansCraig.com
www.DC-Internet-Marketing.com

Come on out for the DC InterTribal Drum Circle
Our Schedule is here: http://bit.ly/lwdrumcircle

(usually the third weekend of every month)

PS: Be on the lookout for our NEW “Sacred Events App” for smartphones. The first one, “DC Sacred Events App” will be FREE to all my loyal readers! Just get on our DC Natives Listing at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dcnatives/join or send email to: dcnatives-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Subscribe to dcnatives

Powered by us.groups.yahoo.com

Get YOUR smartphone  App (i.e. iPhone, Anndroid, Wndows Phone, etc….)
made for YOUR Groups’ Special Events in YOUR customers/clients hands NOW!

Imagine YOUR Mobile App in YOUR Clients/Customers hands

May 8, 2012 Posted by | DC Drum Circle, Native News, Updates | , , , , | Leave a comment

Navajo Nation State of the Union Address

Direct from the Navajo Nation Washington Office

Navajo Nation SealNavajo Nation President Ben Shelly showed unity today by showcasing the work Vice President Rex Lee Jim has been doing for the Navajo Nation during the first day of the Spring Session of the Navajo Nation Council.

Vice President Jim spoke for nearly 20 minutes and delivered the State of the Nation almost entirely in Navajo.

Though Vice President Jim spoke mostly in Navajo, he followed the English written State of the Nation, and his speech outlined some of the initiatives the administration and Vice President Jim have accomplished and are working toward.

Vice President Jim also announced the successful passage of a waiver that saved Indian Health Service and 638 contract health centers as much as $24 million in Medicaid and Medicare funding.

Due to a $1 billion deficit, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer proposed state Medicare and Medicaid cutbacks, but provided a waiver for American Indian tribes in Arizona. The federal government approved her waiver for the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS).

“This waiver also means keeping the doors of health care open for 50,000 Navajo people enrolled in AHCCCS,” according to the written speech

Vice President Jim updated the Council about a planned 2012 Navajo Nation Food Policy Summit, in which health leaders would explore solutions with a food policy to address obesity on the Navajo Nation.

The Navajo Department of Health estimates that 40 percent of Navajo people are obese, and obesity is a contributing factor for heart attacks, heart disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

The summit would bring in Navajo culture into the discussion, and explore the spiritual and nutritional role in a historical perspective while using more current data, Vice President Jim said.

Using the written speech, Vice President Jim said “our people are our strength, and we, as leaders, must lead our people to greater prosperity and opportunities, while keeping our culture alive and strong.”

(see more at http://nnwo.org/content/president-shelly-and-vice-president-jim-gives-state-nation-address )

Evans Craig, Dine’ from Shiprock, NM, Navajo Nation, USA

April 17, 2012 Posted by | Native News, Updates | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

dcnatives DC Intertribal Drum Circle is back! – Sat., Feb. 25 at 3:00-5:00

DC Intertribal Drum Circle
Luminous Warrior Rainbow Tree

Calling all Handrum carriers!

The DC Drum Circle is back & taking 2012 by storm!

Then bring out your hand-drums, because we will be holding an “Intro to a Drum Circle & Blessing” in Washington , DC this Saturday afternoon (Feb 25) at 3:00. We will conduct a blessing, the…n be learning a bit about Drum Etiquette & then learn a hand drum song to start out with.

Location: 520 10TH STREET NW , SECOND FLOOR | WASHINGTON DC 20004

Bring your Hand Drums, Flutes and rattles, & lets have some fun!

Drumming can be healing, meditative, relaxing and/or energizing. It can take you on a journey deep within yourself or to other levels of consciousness. Whether you play a drum, shake a rattle, dance, sing and chant, or simply sit back and take it all in, we all create the… circle together.

So come. Bring a drum, bring a rattle or just bring yourself, and join us for an afternoon of healing, rhythm and spirit. No previous drumming or drum circle experience required, only an open heart and an open mind. All types of drums and percussion instruments welcome as well as didgeridoos and flutes.

Cost: Free event – donations gratefully accepted.

Sign up at Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/events/231636566931117/
or
email Evans (evans@evanscraig.com) or Sara (sara@luminouswarrior.com)
(202)710-2995 or (202) 670-7086

Come on out, usually the third weekend of every month.
See DC Drum Circle Schedule here: http://bit.ly/lwdrumcircle

Evans Craig| DC Internet Marketing Technology | Nations Internet| Internet Technology Service | First Nations Internet Cafe | Tribal Mall

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February 22, 2012 Posted by | Native News | , , , , | Leave a comment

2011 White House Tribal Nations Conference Progress Report

DC Update from the Whitehouse

Achieving a Brighter Future for Tribal Nations

Executive Summary

At the White House Tribal Nations Conference on December 16, 2010, President Obama, joined by Cabinet Secretaries and other senior Administration officials from the Departments of State, Treasury, Defense, Justice, the Interior, Agriculture, Commerce, Labor, Health and Human Services, Housing and Urban Development, Transportation, Energy, Education, Veterans Affairs, Homeland Security, and the Environmental Protection Agency, met with leaders invited from all 565 federally recognized tribes to strengthen the relationship between the U.S. government and tribal governments. In his opening remarks, President Obama discussed his Administration’s comprehensive strategy, developed in consultation with tribal governments, to meet the challenges facing Indian Country—including growing the economy and creating jobs; taking land into trust for federally recognized tribes; improving health care for Native Americans and all Americans; enhancing tribal schools from primary education to tribal colleges; and reforming the way justice is served on Indian reservations.

President Obama also announced that the United States was lending support to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (Declaration). Like the Administration’s strategy for Indian Country, the decision to support the Declaration followed multiple consultation sessions with tribal leaders and other meetings with interested groups and individuals. However, the decision to support the Declaration was not an end in itself. As President Obama made clear: “What matters far more than words—what matters far more than any resolution or declaration—are actions to match those words.”

The Administration’s commitment to that standard of action is reflected in the many federal policies and programs discussed throughout this report that are being implemented by federal agencies in response to concerns raised by American Indians and Alaska Natives. These policies are focused on healthcare, education, public safety and economic development for American Indian and Alaska Native communities and protecting tribal lands and the environment. And federal agencies will continue to be informed by the Declaration as they implement these policies and develop new initiatives together with tribal leaders.

President Barack Obama meets with tribal leaders

Obama Administration Accomplishments for American Indians and Alaska Natives

Since taking office, President Obama and his Administration have made tremendous progress in addressing the major issues of concern to Indian Country. Underlying this progress is President Obama’s strong belief that tribal leaders must be part of the solution and have a seat at the table. At both the 2009 and 2010 White House Tribal Nations Conferences, tribal leaders had discussions with the President and Cabinet officials. In addition, at the 2009 Conference, the President signed a memorandum directing federal agencies to fully implement an Executive Order on tribal consultation. Both actions have led to greater tribal consultation and feedback that has helped shape the Administration’s policy priorities for American Indians and Alaska Natives, which have included improving the quality of care offered by the Indian Health Service, promoting economic development in Indian Country, and making tribal communities safer.

The following highlights some of the key accomplishments that this Administration has achieved in support of Native Americans.

  • Strengthening the Government-to-Government Relationship: In 2009, President Obama signed a memorandum to signal a new era in the government-to-government relationship with Indian Tribes, which has improved communication and inclusiveness. The President directed every agency to develop detailed plans to fully implement Executive Order 13175, “Consultation and Coordination with Tribal Governments.” Federal agencies have submitted the required plans and progress reports, and consultations are now at historic levels. In addition, the President has hosted two White House Tribal Nations Conferences, inviting tribal leaders from each of the 565 federal recognized tribes to meet with Cabinet secretaries and senior Administration officials.
     
  • Improving Health Care and Healthy Living: President Obama signed into law the Affordable Care Act, which is improving the quality of health care and make it more accessible and affordable for all Americans, including Native Americans. The law permanently authorized new and expanded programs and services available to those who use the Indian Health Service, which includes most American Indians and Alaska Natives. In addition, First Lady Michelle Obama launched Let’s Move! in Indian Country, bringing together federal agencies, local communities, nonprofits, corporate partners, and tribes to end the epidemic of childhood obesity in Indian Country within a generation by creating a healthy start on life for children; ensuring families access to healthy, affordable, traditional foods; and increasing opportunities for physical activity.
     
  • Promoting Sustainable Economic Development in Indian Country: President Obama has taken significant steps to promote the economic well-being of Native Americans. The Recovery Act provided more than $3 billion to help tribal communities renovate schools on reservations, spur job creation in tribal economies, improve housing and energy efficiency, and support health facilities and policing services. Recognizing that Indian Country faces unique challenges when it comes to sustainable economic development, the White House Rural Council is working across federal agencies to address these challenges and promote economic prosperity and quality of life in Indian Country and across rural America. The Administration has already made important investments in infrastructure to support economic development in Indian Country. In order to bring high-speed, affordable broadband into tribal communities, both the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Commerce have dedicated programs for this effort and have awarded loans and grants worth over $1.5 billion for projects to benefit tribal areas.  
     
  • Making Tribal Communities Safer: President Obama signed the Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA) into law in July 2010. The TLOA gives tribes greater sentencing authority, improves defendants’ rights, establishes new guidelines and training for officers handling domestic violence and sex crimes, strengthens services to victims; helps combat alcohol and drug abuse, helps at-risk youth, and expands recruitment and retention of Bureau of Indian Affairs and tribal officers and gives them better access to criminal databases. Also, in July 2011, the Department of Justice submitted to Congress a legislative proposal that would recognize certain tribes’ power to exercise concurrent criminal authority over domestic-violence cases, regardless of whether the defendant is Indian or non-Indian. This proposal would significantly improve safety for Native women and allow federal and tribal law enforcement agencies to hold more perpetrators of domestic violence accountable for their crimes. 
     
  • Resolving Longstanding Disputes: President Obama has resolved several significant and longstanding Native American legal claims against the United States. In 2010, the Administration reached a $760 million settlement with Native American farmers and ranchers in the Keepseagle case, alleging discrimination by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in loan programs. Under the agreement, USDA will pay $680 million in damages and forgive $80 million of outstanding farm loan debt. President Obama also signed into law the Claims Resolution Act which includes the Cobell v. Salazar settlement agreement. This class-action suit lawsuit regarding the U.S. government’s trust management and accounting of over three hundred thousand individual American Indian trust accounts had been long-running and highly contentious. In addition, the Claims Resolution Act included four water settlements benefitting seven tribes in Arizona, Montana, and New Mexico.
     
  • Addressing Indigenous Issues: The President announced the United States’ support of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People in December 2010. President Obama and his Administration are working to improve relations with indigenous peoples by looking to the principles embodied in the Declaration in its dealings with federally recognized tribes, while also working with all indigenous individuals and communities in the United States.
     
  • Ensuring Greater Representation for Native Americans: To ensure that Native Americans are represented in this Administration, President Obama appointed Larry Echo Hawk of the Pawnee Nation as Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs, Dr. Yvette Roubideaux of the Rosebud Sioux tribe as the Director of the Indian Health Service, Hilary Tompkins of the Navajo Nation as the Solicitor of the Interior, Lillian Sparks of the Rosebud and Oglala Sioux Tribes as Commissioner for the Administration for Native Americans, Tracie Stevens of the Tulalip Tribes as Chairwoman of the National Indian Gaming Commission, Charles Galbraith of the Navajo Nation as Deputy Associate Director of the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, Kimberly Teehee of the Cherokee Nation as Senior Policy Advisor in the White House Domestic Policy Council, and others. Working with tribal leaders, this team is helping shape federal policies that impact tribal communities.

The Full Report is here: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/2011whtnc_report.pdf

Evans Craig | DC Internet Marketing | Nations Internet | Internet Technology Service | First Nations Internet Cafe | Tribal Mall

January 26, 2012 Posted by | Native News, Updates | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Online Course Introduced for Native American Small Business Owners

DC Update: SBA News Release

U.S. Small Business Administration Press Office

Release Date: January 4, 2012
Release Number: 12-02
Contact: Cecelia Taylor (202) 401-3059
Internet Address: www.sba.gov/news
Follow us on Twitter, Facebook & Blogs

New Online Course Introduced for Native American Small Business Owners

WASHINGTON – Native American entrepreneurs have a new tool to help determine if they’re ready for business ownership and to help them get started. Native American Small Business Primer: Strategies for Success is a free, self-paced online business course developed for Native American business owners. The course provides an overview of basic business principles and makes them aware of the programs and services available from the U.S. Small Business Administration.

Native American Small Business Primer: Strategies for Success will enhance the agency’s effort to provide important resources for emerging Native American entrepreneurs,” said SBA Administrator Karen Mills. “Our ultimate goal is to help create jobs and stimulate economic and business development in our Native American communities. This course is an essential business development tool for the entrepreneur’s toolbox.”

SBA's Starting an Online BusinessThe new online course: emphasizes business planning and market research as essential steps to take before going into business; informs Native American entrepreneurs about the legal aspects of starting a business, including the type of ownership (legal structure) and licensing; and provides key information on seed money for starting up, raising capital, and borrowing money. In addition, there is a section on how to estimate business start-up costs that can help assess the financial needs of going into business.

The course is available from the SBA’s Online Small Business Training web page under Online Courses for Starting Your Business at http://www.sba.gov/content/online-courses-starting-your-business.

SBA’s Office of Native American Affairs works to ensure that American Indian, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiian communities have full access to all SBA programs and services. Each year, more than 200,000 American Indian and Alaska Native and 29,000 Native Hawaiian-owned businesses add billions to the American economy.

Course participants completing the online training programs can earn a certificate of completion from the SBA, with their name, date and course title. The Native American Small Business Primer course is one of nearly 30 online tutorials offered by the SBA’s Online Business Training (www.sba.gov/training). Free courses are offered on Starting a Business, Managing a Business, Financing a Business, and Contracting.

SBA can also help pair new business owners with expert advisers, counseling and mentoring services through an SBA representative or resource partner about management assistance, financing options, or participating local SBA lenders.

Evans Craig | DC Internet Marketing | Nations Internet | Internet Technology Service | First Nations Internet Cafe | Tribal Mall

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January 10, 2012 Posted by | Native News, Updates | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tribal Nations Conference

BIA
President Obama Speaks at the 2011 Tribal Nations Conference

An Update from Ken Salazar, Secretary of the Interior

Dear Evans,

On Friday, December 2, 2011, the White House hosted the Tribal Nations Conference at the Interior Department. The conference continued the meaningful government-to-government dialogue that has made the march of progress happening in Indian Country possible. During his remarks, President Obama again reiterated his deep commitment to making government work better to fulfill our trust management duties, support tribal self-determination and empower American Indian and Alaska Natives to unlock the economic potential of Indian communities. You can watch the President’s remarks here:

This is a promise shared throughout the Obama administration, and Friday’s conference was a great manifestation of the progress we’ve made – bringing together several members of the President’s cabinet, key federal officials from across the administration as well as the White House, and leaders from more than 565 federally-recognized tribes.

During the morning session, I had the pleasure of announcing the promising results of a pilot program to reduce the high incidence of violent crime on four Indian reservations. The Safe Indian Communities initiative, a two-year program that included targeted community policing, achieved a 35 percent overall decrease in violent crime across the four communities.

We know that safer Indian communities mean stronger Indian communities. The positive results from the pilot program are extremely encouraging and far surpassed our goals. We are committed to building on that progress and will be expanding the Safe Indian Communities initiative to other reservations that are experiencing high levels of violent crime.

And throughout last week, I was proud to announce several other initiatives – developed in consultation with tribal leaders – that strengthen consultations, restore greater control to individual American Indians and Alaska Natives and tribes over their lands, reform trust asset management and resolve water rights disputes:

  1. The comprehensive and transparent consultation policy will provide a strong, meaningful role for tribal governments at all stages of federal decision-making on Indian policy. The draft policy embodies the best consultation practices and most innovative methods available, contains detailed accountability requirements for Interior managers, responds to the needs of tribal leaders to be more engaged in policy development and promotes more responsible decision-making on issues affecting Indian Country.
  2. The sweeping reform of antiquated, “one-size-fits-all” federal leasing regulations for the 56 million surface acres the federal government holds in trust for tribes and individual Indians will provide landowners certainty and flexibility on the use of their land. The revised regulations, the most comprehensive reform of Indian land leasing rules in more than 50 years, will streamline the approval process for home ownership, expedite business leases and spur renewable energy development in Indian Country.
  3. The Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform was activated by naming five prominent tribal leaders to this national commission to undertake a forward-looking, comprehensive evaluation of how Interior manages nearly $4 billion in American Indian trust funds. The goal is to make the trust administration system more transparent, responsive, customer-friendly and accountable.
  4. The release of $21 million under the Soboba of Luiseño Indians Settlement Act marks the final step in an historic water rights settlement and fulfills promises made to the Soboba Band and southern California communities when Congress approved the Act in 2008. The settlement will stabilize water supplies in the San Jacinto River Basin and enhance economic development opportunities for the Soboba Band and its neighbors.

These initiatives build on other Administration achievements during the past three years, including the historic $3.4 billion Cobell Settlement that addresses long-standing injustices; $1 billion in settlements to meet the critical water needs of Native American communities; the Tribal Law and Order Act, which allowed federal agencies to accelerate their focus on safe tribal communities; and acquiring more than 157,000 acres of land in trust on behalf of tribal nations.

Over the last three years we have made tremendous progress in Indian Country.  A lot of that progress is possible because the ideas that tribal leadership has shared at these conferences.  But we know we haven’t solved all of our problems and there is much work to be done. But I am confident with your help there isn’t anything we cannot achieve. As the President said today, this Administration has your back.

Sincerely,

Ken Salazar
Secretary of the Interior

December 8, 2011 Posted by | Native News | , , | 1 Comment

2011/2012 Pow-Wow Update (60th Annual Chickahominy Fall Festival & Pow-Wow This Week)

* September 24-25, 2011
60th Annual Chickahominy Fall Festival & Pow-Wow This Weekend, Providence Forge, VA. Contact Keith Wynn, (804) 966-2448 or (804) 829-2027 website: www.chickahominytribe.org

* November 3, 2011 
Fredericksburg, Virginia Pow-Wow will not be sponsored this year. We hope to be back next year. We will however sponsor a cultural exchange in Fredericksburg.

* November 11-13
Richmond, Virginia Pow-wow Press Release below. Please distribute to family, friends, press and others.

 Press Release

21th ANNUAL RICHMOND , VIRGINIA POW-WOW AND SHOW SCHEDULED FOR NOVEMBER-PUBLIC INVITED

Hollister, NC – November is Native American month. Pow-Wow, an American Indian owned and operated company, will sponsor the 21th annual Great American Indian Exposition Pow-Wow and Show on November 11-13, 2011 in Richmond , VA. Pow-Wow invites the public to join us at this joyous celebration. The event will be held at The Showplace, which is located at 3000 Mechanicsville Turnpike, Richmond , VA 23223.

The pow-wow is an opportunity for the public to interact with over 200 American Indian dancers, singers, drummers, artists, and crafts persons. Also, this event is an attempt by Pow-Wow to educate the public about American Indians, past and present, through the arts. Over $10,000 will be offered in dance and drum prizes, which will attract more than 200 dancers in full regalia from throughout the United States and Canada . At least Seven (7) drums are expected.

Gates open at 9:00AM on Friday, November 11th for a cultural exchange for area schools. Native American Cultural Exchange programs allow teachers, students, and others to interact with our population. The public is welcome also all day on Friday. Grand entry (parade of nations) on Friday starts at 6PM and concludes at 9:00PM.

On Saturday, gates will open at 11:00AM, and the event will kick off with a parade of nations (grand entry) at 12:00 noon. Over 100 Tribes will be represented at this year’s event, and they include: Haliwa-Saponi, Piscataway, Chickahominy, Rappahannock, Cherokee, Sioux, Iroquois, Lumbee, Hopi, Mattaponi , Nansemond, Choctaw, Navajo, and so many other Tribes and nations.

The public will be able to visit with and buy from some of the best arts and crafts vendors/ demonstrators in the United States . Items for sale include turquoise jewelry, moccasins, beadwork, rugs, books, and paintings to name a few. Renowned fine artists and jewelers will be represented at this year’s event.

Face painting will be available for children and others. A tipi will be set up for public visitation. Bow-‘n-’ arrow shooting will also be available for the whole family.

Buffalo stew, Indian Tacos and buffalo burgers are just a few of the delicious Native American food items that will be on sale at the event. American fare such as hot dogs will be sold too.

Admission is $10 for everyone on Friday. The price on Saturday and Sunday is as follows: Ages 3-12: $6:00 Ages 13-up: $10.00. Tickets purchased in advance cost $8.50 for Friday (everyone) and $8.50 for adults on Saturday and Sunday, $5 for children. Groups of 10 or more scheduled for Saturday and Sunday pay $8.50 for adults and $3.50 for children. This offer is not good with any other coupons.

Show-times are: Friday: 9:00 A.M.-9:00 P.M. Saturday -9:00AM-8:00PM (early bird shopping on Saturday morning) and Sunday 11:00AM-6:00PM. This is a rain or shine event (we are inside)!!!

Call the show promoter, Barry Richardson, at (252) 532-0821 or send e-mail to: powwow@vance.net. Call the Showplace at (804) 225-8877.

OUR WEB-SITE IS: http://www.myspace.com/powwow4life

TELEVISION AND PHOTO OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE

Head Staff:

Keith Colston (Lumbee/Tuscarora): MC
Schirra Gray (Piscataway):Head male dancer
Dawnita Neconie (Kiowa, Otoe-Missouria and Pawnee):Head Female Dancer
Becky Adkins Branch (Lumbee/Chickahominy): Head Tabulator
Marvin “Marty” Richardson (Haliwa-Saponi): Head Judge
Ray Silva (Laguna Pueblo): Arena Director

Prize Money:

Drum: Categories: $2,000, $1,000 and $500 (Drum Appreciation Offering Saturday and Sunday)
Adults (Traditional, Fancy, Grass and Jingle): $500, $250 and $125
Jrs (same categories as above): $75, $50 and $25
Boys/Girls: $$50, $25 and $15
Tiny Tots: $10

Specials Sponsored By Pow-Wow:

Men’s fancy ($500) in honor of Ray Littleturtle (Lumbee Cheraw) (All Ages)
Men’s traditional ($500) in honor of George “Whitewolf” Branham-Monacan (Must be 50 or older)

Host Hotel:

The Crowne Plaza in Richmond is the host hotel ($51 a night!!!!!!). Call 804-285-9951 to make hotel reservations for the Richmond Pow-Wow.

Vending Space Available (not food)

September 22, 2011 Posted by | Native News, Updates | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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